QUESTION: The market for skincare delivery systems is forecast to reach US$543 million in 2020. Are encapsulated delivery systems such as liposomes, microcapsules and millicapsules the answer to increasing product performance while delivering active ingredients in a controlled manner?

LEARNING: THIS IS A SPACE THAT’S GOING TO BE INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT TO THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY AND SO WE’VE INCREASED INVESTMENT AND THE TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATED WITH THAT.

Lisa Zwart said delivery systems are important because if you’re promising a product can do something but it’s just going to go and sit on the skin, it’s not going to be really functional.

“These micro delivery systems allow it to have slow release, to potentiate activity, and stabilise the ingredients. All those things are so important in having that overall outcome with these amazing ingredients.”

Shellie Pearson said that she works with liposomes and nanoparticles in particular.

“Knowing that my active is going to do its job well, I also know that comprised in those delivery systems are liquids and those liquids are physiological to the skin. So once the active is dispersed into the skin, those liquids then start to form that first line of skin barrier defence.”

Michelle Reeve said first – do no harm.

“Offering a balance between efficacy and safety is so important.”

Beth Charlton knows with the use of liposomes – the delivery system – it actually releases a ceramide upon delivery, which then goes towards repairing and looking after the skin barrier.

“There are actually quite a few papers on that.”

Jodi Ayre said clients are really demanding results, but that it also comes back to being able to protect their skin health.

“We’re using those microencapsulation technologies to support the liquid barrier, and at the same time release delivery, particularly when we’re thinking about something like retinol that has that rapid delivery effect.”