QUESTION: While the federal government has legalised the cultivation of cannabis for medical or scientific purposes, the current regulation inhibits the use of CBD in skincare products in Australia. Do you foresee this changing in the future?

LEARNING: INDUSTRY LEADERS AREN’T QUICK TO JUMP ON THE CBD BANGWAGON JUST YET. FURTHER TRIALS AND TESTING ARE REQUIRED UNTIL ITS TRUE EFFECTIVENESS CAN BE UNDERSTOOD.

Lisa Zwart said that while there is a lot of anecdotal evidence, there’s not enough scientific evidence to prove that it does really have a place in the skincare market currently.

“Again, it boils down to education… I’m really not too sure where this will go with the TGA and what their thoughts are on it.”

Shellie Pearson said lots of things also become legalised in Australia, but that doesn’t mean that we should use them.

“As a skin therapist, I’m looking for sustainable health for my clients, for their skin, so I’m wanting something that I can be able to give to my clients that’s long term.”

Michelle Reeve said clinical trials are paramount.

“You need to know the efficacy of these ingredients and I think that even consumers [are] still a little wary around gimmicky ingredients.”

Jodi Ayre is focussed on skin health foundations and what therapists can already do to address those skin concerns.

“It’s also the investment in the professional skin therapist and giving them the skills to be able to again, have that powerful conversation with a customer to educate and to help them achieve their goals along the way of skin health journey.”